AAP Top 10 2016 #7: Apple juice versus electrolyte solution in gastroenteritis

Effect of Dilute Apple Juice and Preferred Fluids vs Electrolyte Maintenance Solution on Treatment Failure Among Children With Mild Gastroenteritis: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Stephen B. Freedman, MDCM, MSc, Andrew R. Willan, PhD, Kathy Boutis, MD

JAMA, 2015

Links   PubMed   JAMA   pdf

The Bottom Line

Children with mild gastroenteritis who got dilute apple juice initially followed by preferred fluids had fewer treatment failures than children given electrolyte maintenance solution probably because the latter tastes terrible.

What They Did

  • This was a non inferiority trial. Patients with mild AGE were randomized to half-strength apple juice/preferred fluids (n=323) or apple-flavored electrolyte maintenance solution (n=324) and did oral rehydration therapy.
  • Kids could get ondansetron
  • Patients were followed daily by nurse phone calls until they were asymptomatic for 24 hours. The nurse was blinded to which treatment arm the child was in.
  • In the ED the first group got dilute apple juice and could then choose what they wanted at home.
  • The primary outcome was treatment failure defined as any of the following happening within 7 days:
    • IV rehydration
    • Admission
    • Unscheduled physician encounter
    • Protracted symptoms
    • Crossover to the other group
    • 3% or more weight loss or significant dehydration at in-person follow-up
  • Overall they noted that the dilute apple juice group had treatment failure less often than those given electrolyte maintenance solution (16.7% vs 25.0%; difference, −8.3%; 97.5% CI, −  to −2.0%; P < .001 for inferiority and P = .006 for superiority)
  • Fewer apple juice/preferred fluids kids received IV rehydration (2.5% vs 9.0%; difference, −6.5%; 99% CI, −11.6% to −1.8%)
  • Hospitalization rates and diarrhea and vomiting frequency were not significantly different between groups (secondary outcomes)

What You Can Do

By | 2016-12-14T13:27:36+00:00 December 15th, 2016|Infectious Diseases, Resuscitation|

About the Author:

Brad Sobolewski, MD, MEd is an Assistant Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine and an Assistant Director for the Pediatric Residency Training Program at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. He is on Twitter @PEMTweets and authors the Pediatric Emergency Medicine site PEMBlog. All views are strictly my own and not official medical advice.