An Interview with Theresa Frey about Intranasal Ketamine

I am delighted to bring you this special episode of PEM Currents, the Pediatric Emergency Medicine podcast. It’s all about intranasal ketamine and its use for acute pain management in the Pediatric Emergency Department. I had the pleasure of interviewing Theresa Frey, Assistant Professor from the Division of Emergency Medicine at Cincinnati Children’s. Theresa is the 2016 winner of the Ken Graff Award from the AAP’s Section on Emergency Medicine. Funding from the award supported her study comparing intranasal fentanyl and intranasal ketamine in a randomized controlled trial for the treatment of acute, long bone fracture pain. We talk about the existing evidence, what’s to come in the future and how you can learn more about intranasal ketamine.

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References

Graudins A, Meek R, Egerton-Warburton D, Oakley E, Seith R. The PICHFORK (Pain in Children Fentanyl or Ketamine) Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Intranasal Ketamine and Fentanyl for the Relief of Moderate to Severe Pain in Children With Limb Injuries. Annals of emergency medicine. 2015;65(3):248-254.e241.

Reynolds SL, Bryant KK, Studnek JR, et al. Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial of Intranasal Ketamine Compared to Intranasal Fentanyl for Analgesia in Children with Suspected Extremity Fractures. Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine. 2017.

Yeaman F, Oakley E, Meek R, Graudins A. Sub-dissociative dose intranasal ketamine for limb injury pain in children in the emergency department: a pilot study. Emergency medicine Australasia : EMA. 2013;25(2):161-167.

By |2018-11-02T11:55:02+00:00November 2nd, 2018|Orthopedics, Podcasts, Procedures|

About the Author:

Brad Sobolewski, MD, MEd is an Associate Professor of Pediatric Emergency Medicine and an Assistant Director for the Pediatric Residency Training Program at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. He is on Twitter @PEMTweets and authors the Pediatric Emergency Medicine site PEMBlog. All views are strictly my own and not official medical advice.

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